Book Groups @Shaker Library

Lively discussions! Engaging book selections! Interesting people! These are just some of the benefits of joining one of the library’s book discussion groups that meet once a month.

We make it easy. All you have to do is pick up your copy of each monthly read and join in!

Contact us to reserve your place or stop by the Library Information Desk to pick up your copy of the book.

Join us as we discuss a variety of award winning titles, including those from the Pulitzer, Booker, and National Book Award Lists.

Award Winners Book Discussion is led by Lynne Miller. The group meets from 2-3:30pm at the Bertram Woods Branch. Please register and pick up books at the Bertram Woods Information Desk one month before the discussion.

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

Community Book Discussion

In Evicted, MacArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Evicted transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of 21st-century America’s most devastating problems. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible.

2pm Saturday, January 20

Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann

Winner of the 2009 National Book Award, McCann’s novel offers a dazzling and hauntingly rich vision of the loveliness, pain, and mystery of life in New York City in the 1970s.

2pm Saturday, March 17

Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast

New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast’s memoir is an intimate look at the lives of her aging parents and their only child. This poignant and funny graphic novel was the winner of the 2014 National Book Critics Circle award for autobiography.

2pm Saturday, May 12

Book Buzz is led by Lynda Thomas. The group meets from 10-11:30am at the Main Library. Please register and pick up books at the Main Library Information Desk one month before the discussion.

  A Lowcountry Heart: Reflections on a Writing Life By Pat Conroy

This volume of Pat Conroy’s nonfiction brings together some of the most charming interviews, magazine articles, speeches, and letters from his long literary career. Ranging across diverse subjects, these eminently memorable pieces offer a unique window into the life of a true titan of Southern writing.

10am Tuesday, January 9
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

In Evicted, MacArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Evicted transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of 21st-century America’s most devastating problems. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible.

10am Tuesday, February 13
  The Leavers By Lisa Ko

In the Bronx, an undocumented Chinese immigrant mysteriously disappears without a trace and her eleven-year-old son is left bewildered and heart-broken. After being adopted into a white family, he struggles between assimilation and memories of his mother, and never stops wondering what happened to her.

10am Tuesday, March 13
Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger

Forty years later in life, Frank Drum reflects on the Minnesota summer of 1961 when he was a thirteen-year-old boy struck by unexpected tragedy, thrust into an adult world full of secrets, lies, adultery, and betrayal.

10am Tuesday, April 10

Do you like to cook or bake? Love experimenting in the kitchen and trying new cuisines? If so, join “Cook the Book,” Shaker Library’s new cookbooks Club! Each month, we’ll select a cookbook and each member will make a dish from that book. Discussion will be about the recipe, the cookbook, what worked (or didn’t), why you chose the recipe, etc.

Cook the Book! is led by Lynne Miller and Jim Bagwell. The group meets from 7-8:30pm. Please register and pick up books at the Bertram Woods Branch Information Desk one month before the discussion.

  One Pan & Done: Hassle-free Meals from the Oven to Your Table by Molly Gilbert

With more than 130 recipes, this cookbook features meals made in a single pan, whether it be a sheet pan, a cake pan, a cast iron skillet or a dutch oven.

7pm Wednesday, January 3
  The Beach House Cookbook: Easy Breezy Recipes with a Southern Accent by Mary Kay Andrews

Novelist Mary Kay Andrews is known for summery books set on the coasts of the American southeast.  In this cookbook, she shares recipes from her own beach house, sure to transport you to the sun and sand.

7pm Wednesday, February 7
Breakfast for Dinner: Recipes for Frittata Florentine, Huevos Rancheros, Sunny-Side-Up Burgers, and More! by Lindsay Landis & Taylor Hackbarth

If you like breakfast any time of day, this cookbook offers more than 100 recipes to wake you up with fresh takes on old favorites.

7pm Wednesday, March 7
Nigella Kitchen: Recipes from the Heart of the Home by Nigella Lawson

Complete with tips and tricks in the “kitchen confidential section,” Lawson’s book includes over 200 recipes – from easy to complicated – to suit a range of abilities.

7pm Wednesday, April 4

The Fourth Tuesday Book Group is led by Janis Williams. the group meets from 2-3:30pm at the Main Library. Please register and pick up books at the Main Library Information Desk one month before the discussion.

  H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald

Mabel, Helen’s goshawk, has a temperament that mirrors her own state of grief after her father’s death.

Fierce and feral, together raptor and human “discover the pain and beauty of being alive.”

2pm Tuesday, January 23
  The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht

A brilliant latticework of family legend, loss, and love. A young doctor confronts the inexplicable circumstances surrounding her beloved grandfather’s recent death. She searches for clues in the stories he told her of his encounters over the years with “the deathless man.” Most extraordinary of all is the story he never told her–the legend of the tiger’s wife.

2pm Tuesday, February 27
  Killers of the Flower Moon: the Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann

A twisting, haunting, true-life murder mystery and a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes based on years of research and startling new evidence. A searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long.

2pm Tuesday, March 27
Treachery at Lancaster Gate by Anne Perry

When an explosion in Victorian London kills two policemen and seriously injures three more, many believe that anarchists are the culprits. But Thomas Pitt, commander of Special Branch, knows well enough that someone with decidedly more personal motives lit the deadly fuse and his hunch may bury him alive.

2pm Tuesday, April 24

Mystery Book Discussions are led by Pam Tidwell and Lynne Miller. The group meets from 7:30-8:30pm at the Main Library.

Please register and pick up books at the Main Library Information Desk one month before the discussion.

  In Bitter Chill by Sarah Ward

Two eight-year-old girls go missing.  A few hours later only one of the girls, Rachel Jones, wanders out of the woods unhurt remembering only that a woman took her.  Thirty-six years later Yvonne Jenkins, the mother of the other missing girl commits suicide and within days the body of Penny Lander, a former teacher of the girls, is found strangled in the same woods they went missing. The case is reopened and it’s up to Detective Inspector Frances Sandler and Rachel, now a family genealogist, to dig up town secrets and solve the case.

7:30pm Tuesday, January 9
  A Midsummer’s Equation by Keigo Higashino

The dying resort town of Hari Cove, Japan is divided sharply over the plan to have an offshore underwater-mining operation along its shores which promises to boost the nation’s economy.  In order to shed some light on the situation, physicist Manabu Yukawa is asked to present at what will be a very heated town meeting. The next day, Tsukahara, a former Tokyo police detective, turns up dead at the bottom of the cliffs.  Local police would like to label the scene an accident but autopsy results reveal otherwise and Manabu, known as “Detective Galileo”, is drawn into the case.

7:30pm Tuesday, February 13
Even the Dead by Benjamin Black

Dublin pathologist Quirke, suffering hallucinations and needing rest, gets pulled into another investigation when he discovers that what appears to be just a fatal car accident might be a homicide.  Meanwhile, his daughter asks him to look into the disappearance of a pregnant woman. Quirke reaches out to his friend Inspector Haskett to help him untangle the mess.

7:30pm Tuesday, March 13
The Dry by Jane Harper

Agent Aaron Falk has no intention of going back to the town he grew up in and was run out of twenty years earlier, however, it appears his former best friend has murdered his wife and son and turned the gun on himself.  His friend’s father wants him to investigate but long-held secrets might be better off buried.

7:30pm Tuesday, April 10

Enjoy a burger and beer with your biography? A martini with your mystery? Then please join us for some “savory” stories and a “spirited” discussion of a good book.

Pub Reads is led by Rachel Wilhoyte and Stacie Anderson. The group meets from 7-8:30pm at The Academy Tavern. Copies will be available at the Main Library Reference desk for loan one month before the discussion and at Loganberry Books for sale.

The Academy Tavern is at 12800 Larchmere Blvd. Loganberry Books is at 13015 Larchmere.

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah

Born to a black Xhosa mother and a white Swiss father under apartheid in South Africa, this is the fascinating memoir in 18 essays, focusing on Noah’s relationship with his parents and his childhood during a time that considered his very existence a crime.

7pm Monday, January 8
A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles

In 1922, Count Alexander Rostov is sentenced to house arrest in the grand Metropol, across the street from the Kremlin. A former aristocrat, he must now settle into a simpler life in a small attic room. As the decades pass, Rostov finds his purpose in the human connections he makes in the microcosm of the world within the hotel.

7pm Monday, February 12
Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond

In Evicted, MacArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond follows eight families in Milwaukee as they struggle to keep a roof over their heads. Evicted transforms our understanding of poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving one of 21st-century America’s most devastating problems. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible.

7pm Monday, March 12
  The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

In this 2016 National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize alternative history novel, Whitehead envisions the Underground Railroad as a literal train. Cora and Caesar escape from a plantation in the Southeastern United States but the escape doesn’t go as planned and they are now being pursued by Ridgeway, a slave catcher. As they travel north, each stop illustrates the echoes of a history we all share.

7pm Monday, April 9